Providence

 

At the time of the 1790 US census, 5% of the population lived in cities; by 2010 that number had climbed to 80%. People are living in closer proximity to each other now than at any other time in human history.  And where people live close together, the potential of beauty is great. Cities are the epicenters of radical change in the world. From the kiln-baked walls of ancient Akkad by the Tigris to the height of great New York where she stands like a sequoia over the islands, throughout human history, when the historical wheel turns, the axis of that turning is always a city.

Cities matter.

Among cities Providence is small, but overflowing with amazing food, art and culture. It’s rich in diversity and history. It’s famous for world class universities, proximity to the ocean, interesting architecture and a weird, progressive vibe. It’s a wonderful place to live.

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Among cities Providence is small, but overflowing with amazing food, art and culture.

The thing about Providence is that it's also famous for being one of “the least Bible-minded cities in America” (according to Barna reports in recent years). Providence is a city where the majority of people do not claim to know the God of the Bible in a personal way. The city is filled with agnostics and atheists, lapsed Catholics and Protestants, and even a small segment of antagonists. Most, though, have little interest in God—and less in developing an intimate relationship with the person of Jesus Christ.

This state of things in our city is not something we are judgmental about. We don’t look down on anyone for how they live or what they believe. But we genuinely feel broken-hearted that so many people seem to be ignoring something that has such power to satisfy the soul. We love the city and the many beautiful people in this city. We dream of a new Providence that isn’t famous for its ignorance of Christ but is famous for its depth in God!